• Leah

October Resource Roundup



October is a month full of awareness for so many important topics. Down Syndrome, bullying prevention, domestic violence awareness, and mental health awareness are only a few topics this month. It is important to be aware of as many issues as possible as many could affect anyone. Gaining knowledge in many of these subjects could save a life and help someone live their lives to the fullest.


Down Syndrome Awareness

Down Syndrome occurs when someone is born with an extra chromosome. Generally, a person is born with 46 but those with Down Syndrome have 47. Having Down Syndrome is considered an intellectual disability and is lifelong for those who have it. However, this is not to say that a person with Down Syndrome is limited in their life. Everyone has challenges in their lives, so who is to say a person with a disability cannot overcome their challenges as well? They can have a steady career, families, and live independent, happy lives just like everyone else.


Resources:

Down Syndrome Association of Greater STL

1300 Strassner Dr, Brentwood, MO 63144


Bullying Prevention

It is no secret that bullying happens all the time. It is a common occurrence and has many short and long term effects. For students in grades 9-12, 19% of them will be bullied and 15% will be cyberbullied. Having so much emotional and potentially physical harm thrown at these children who are supposed to be safe in school can take a toll on their wellbeing. This can lead to feelings of anxiety, depression, and loneliness. These consequences can also follow a person into their adulthood. Being someone who bullies can also have harmful impacts. They may also have these same issues. On top of this, they may become abusive to partners or family, have substance or alcohol abuse problems, and may engage in other criminal activities such as fighting. Bullying is full of negative outcomes for both bullying victims and bullies which is why it is so important to educate children on the effects of this issue. Creating a mentally healthy child could create a mentally healthy adult.


Resources

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline:

1-800-273-8255 (English)

1-888-628-9454 (Español)

School not taking action?

State Department of Education (IL)- (217) 782-4321

Nami

STL website

314-962-4670

Nami STL Resources Page

Find Counseling on Psychology Today (Find therapists in your area)


Domestic Violence Awareness

1 in 3 women and 1 in 4 men have experienced domestic abuse while 10 million men and women are physically abused each year. Domestic violence is an issue that can affect anyone regardless of gender, economic status, sexuality, etc. Oftentimes, it is an unexpected experience when a partner commits this abuse. Domestic abuse can include: control, intimidation, emotional, sexual, or physical abuse, degradation, or isolation. It may be difficult at times to tell if domestic abuse is occurring because oftentimes, the abuser will make their victim think they are crazy or dramatic. Some warning signs to look out for are isolation or extreme jealousy over friends or family, pressured sex or other unwanted activities, insults, destructiveness, or intimidation. It is very important that friends and family pay attention to their loved one’s partner if they sense something is wrong. It is also essential for loved one’s to feel like they can safely confide in a friend or family member. It can be difficult and scary to leave an abusive relationship, but there are so many resources and supports to make it possible.


Resources:

Violence Prevention Center Southwestern Illinois

(Español)

618-235-0892 (24/7 Call crisis line, emergency shelter, schedule counseling appointments, contact legal advocate)

618-920-2590 (24/7 Text crisis line)

Serves Monroe County, Randolph County, and St. Claire County

National Domestic Violence Hotline

Text “START” to 88788 (Text line)

1-800-799-7233 (Crisis Hotline)

Counseling Information on Psychology Today (Find therapists in your area).


Mental Illness Awareness

October 3rd-9th focuses on raising awareness for mental illnesses and advocating for those who have them. Mental health can greatly affect a person’s life as well as the loved ones around them. This is why it is so important to be aware of mental health issues. They are also fairly common. Each year 1 in 5 adults are diagnosed with a mental illness and 1 in 20 are diagnosed with a very serious mental illness. The three most diagnosed mental illnesses each year are anxiety disorders, depression, and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). It is possible to gain one of these mental illnesses due to being in a difficult situation or having a very severe, harmful experience. Many people have experienced anxiety, depression and PTSD because of the COVID-19 pandemic. Staying home, being unable to see others, housing and food insecurity, financial worries, loved ones passing away, or having the fear of getting sick have all been reasons for these diagnoses. It is so important to dissolve the stigma around mental health and to take it seriously. Educating people on this issue could help so many individuals and their loved ones live happier, healthier lives.


Resources

Information on mental health

Counseling (Find therapists in your area)

Mental health help hotline: 1-800-662-4357

Mental health information hotline: 1-800-487-4889 (Español or English)

SAMSA Mental health information and resource site


References


Down Syndrome

https://dsagsl.org/about/down-syndrome/


Bullying

https://www.stopbullying.gov/resources/facts#_Fast_Facts

https://www.stopbullying.gov/bullying/effects

https://www.namistl.org/

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us


Domestic Violence

https://www.thehotline.org/#

https://www.vpcswi.org/

https://ncadv.org/STATISTICS


Mental Health

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/about/director/messages/2021/one-year-in-covid-19-and-mentalhealth

https://www.nami.org/get-involved/awareness-events/mental-illness-awareness-week

https://www.samhsa.gov/find-help/national-helpline


This resource list is by Leah, our practicum social worker from SIUE.


For more information on community resources, you can book an appointment with a library social worker by emailing socialworkers@caseyvillelibrary.org or calling 618-345-5848.



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